Low FODMAP Diet

If you’re feeling extra bloated, lethargic and all around uncomfortable from all the rich holiday foods, trying a low FODMAP diet will help you get back to baseline! This diet can be a bit of a commitment, if you decide to go all in. But it is easily customized and modified for your needs!

 

What are FODMAPs?

FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyols (short chain carbohydrates and sugar alcohols that are poorly absorbed by the body, causing intestinal distress).  FODMAPs occur naturally in some foods or are added to foods in the form of additives and preservatives. FODMAPs ferment in the large intestine during digestion, creating gas and causing the intestine to expand, leading to discomfort, pain and bloating. FODMAPs are indeed found in many healthy foods, like fruit and vegetables. This does not make them unhealthy, rather, some may simply have a higher sensitivity to that particular fruit or vegetable.

 

Common FODMAPs

Fructose- Found in fruits and vegetables

Fructans- Found in some fruits, vegetables and grains

Lactose- Found in many dairy products

Galactans- Found in legumes

Polyols- Found in artificial sweeteners

 

High FODMAP Foods

 

Apples

Pears

Mangoes

Cherries

Figs

Watermelon

Dried Fruits

Peaches

Blackberries

Plums

Artichoke

Garlic

Leeks

Onion

Mushrooms

Cauliflower

Snow Peas

Wholemeal bread

Rye

Muesli

Wheat pasta

Red Kidney Beans

Split Peas

Falafels

Baked Beans

Soft Cheeses

Milk

Yogurt

Cashews

Pistachios

Honey

High Fructose Corn Syrup

Sorbitol

Xylitol

Erythrytol

Chorizo

Sausage

 

 

This list is not comprehensive and is only meant to give an overview of some high FODMAP foods.

 

 

What is a low FODMAP diet?

A low FODMAP diet is a diet that restricts and eliminates foods that are high in those FODMAPs that cause intestinal issues like bloating, pain, constipation, diarrhea, and gas. The diet is meant to last 3-8 weeks before slowly reintroducing other foods to determine if certain foods trigger symptoms. Because this is a very restrictive diet, it is not meant for long term use. This is an elimination diet that can help give the digestive tract a good reset, as it is gentle on the system. This diet is traditionally used to aid people who live with Irritable Bowel Syndrome to identify triggering foods, but the guidelines for a low FODMAP diet work well for a general belly reboot too!

 

Low FODMAP Foods

 

Banana

Blueberry

Cantaloupe

Dragon Fruit

Grapes

Guava

Honeydew

Kiwi

Lime

Lemon

Mandarins

Oranges

Papaya

Pineapple

Prickly Pear

Raspberry

Strawberries

Bean Sprouts

Beets

Black Beans

Broccoli

Brussel Sprouts

Butternut Squash

Cabbage

Carrots

Chick Peas

Cucumber

Green Beans

Green Pepper

Ginger

Kale

Lentils

Lettuce

Potato

Pumpkin

Raddish

Spaghetti Squash

Tomato

Yam

Zucchini

Beef

Chicken

Lamb

Pork

Turkey

Cold Cuts

Canned Tuna

Fresh Fish

Coconut-milk, cream, flesh

Corn products

Gluten-free and Wheat-free products

Oats

Oatmeal

Quinoa

Rice and Rice Flour

Chia Seeds

Hemp Seeds

Poppy Seeds

Pumpkin Seeds

Sesame Seeds

Butter

Ghee

Brie Cheese

Camembert Cheese

Cheddar Cheese

Feta Cheese

Monterey Jack

Eggs

Almond Milk

Hemp Milk

Lactose-Free Milk

Oat Milk

Rice Milk

Soy products

Tempeh

 

 

This list is not comprehensive and is only meant to give an overview of some low FODMAP foods.

 

Be mindful of condiments and sauces, as many are loaded with FODMAPs.

 

3 Steps

 

 Step 1: Low FODMAP Diet

For 3-8 weeks- swap high FODMAP foods for low FODMAP foods.

 

Step 2: FODMAP Reintroduction

Over the following 8-12 weeks reintroduce one FODMAP at a time, one food at a time, over the course of three days. Increase serving size each day and monitor your tolerance.

 

 

Step 3: FODMAP Customization

As you have reintroduced foods and FODMAPs slowly, you’re much more aware of what your body tolerates and what it does not. Going forward, you can tailor your diet to your specific needs. Your body should be feeling much better at this point, as you avoid foods that are triggering for you.

 

Add your comment or reply. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *